Link to this Article: http://www.llewellyn.com/journal/article/1084

The Llewellyn Journal

The Magic and Mystery of the Seasons

This article was written by Stephanie Rose Bird
posted under Pagan

The premise for Four Seasons of Mojo revolves around the magical ability of the seasons to enhance life. This book provides readers with useful ideas unrestricted by geographic borders, ethnicity, religion or magical path. Within its pages you will find inspirations from across the globe. Here is a sampling of the cornucopia of ideas you’ll harvest by reading Four Seasons of Mojo:



Tears From the Heavens
Much of Four Seasons of Mojo centers on Africa, the Caribbean, and the Americas. There are practices in these locales that we can all utilize to live more joyfully. In Africa, for example, duality is highly touted. The year is divided into two opposing weather conditions: the wet and the dry. The dry is a time when life is challenged—resources literally dry up. Water, the most cherished elixir of life, is hard for animals, humans, or plants to find. Conversely, the wet is joyous; still, it has its own challenges. The joy comes from the first rains of the season, since they assure the continuance of life. The interaction between earth and the heavens is heightened. Rock-hard soil becomes malleable enough to make mud, useful as a health and beauty remedy as well as supplying material for constructing homes.

In the United States, many people have become distanced from the seasons. Frequently, weather is looked upon as a temporary nuisance, reported by a weather person rather than directly observed by the seers of the immediate community. Whereas the wet season in Africa and many other locales is a time for celebration, here rain is something that threatens our outdoor events, or more trivial still, moist weather causes frizzy hair. It’s only when droughts occur and farms, flowers, or endless lawns are dried to a frizzled brown that we tend to take heed of the necessity of rain.

Then there are people intensely interested in the seasons and their relationship to the economy. It is a sad reality that most of the agrarian celebrations that have survived to the present day have only been kept alive because they afford an opportunity to make money from the mass marketing of food, gifts, and costly indulgence. With spring in the air, here are some holistic ideas for engaging the natural gifts of the season.


Working With Rain
Instead of hiding out from rain, sulking, or complaining, shift your focus and treasure the rain. Here are some ways to enjoy rain:

This is only a small taste of what Four Seasons of Mojo has in store. I hope my new book serves as an aid in your magical and mundane life, helping you engage in that circular journey we refer to as “the seasons.”


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