Link to this Article: http://www.llewellyn.com/journal/article/1820

The Llewellyn Journal

A Solitary Ritual of Thanks

This article was written by Scott Cunningham
posted under Pagan

(You alone will know when to perform this ritual. It can be done at any phase of the moon, during the day or night, whenever needed.)

You’ll need one large white or pink bowl; one white candle; water; small, fresh flowers (white blooms are best) and one piece of white cotton cloth.

Place the bowl on the altar (or on any table). If desired, cast a circle. Affix the white candle to the center of the bowl with warmed beeswax or with drippings from another white candle (so that the bowl acts as a candle holder).

Pour water into the bowl. Float the fresh flowers on the surface of the water. Light the candle.

Visualize your reason for the ritual; remember why you’re thanking the Goddess and God. Touch the water on both sides of the candle with your fingertips, saying these or similar words:

A Solitary Ritual of Thanks from Living Wicca by Scott CunninghamLady of the Moon, of the stars and the Earth;
Lord of the Sun, of the forests and the hills;
I perform a ritual of thanks.
My love shines like the flame;
My love floats like the petals
Upon You.
Lady of the Waters, of flowers and the sea;
Lord of the Air, of horns and of fire;
I perform a ritual of thanks.
My love shines like the flame;
My love floats like the petals
Upon You.
Lady of the Caves, of cats and snakes;
Lord of the Plains, of falcons and stags;
I perform a ritual of thanks.
My love shines like the flame;
My love floats like the petals
Upon You.


Look into the candle’s flame, then down into the water. Blow gently upon the water’s surface and watch the flowers’ movements. Meditate. Commune. Thank.

When it’s time, remove the petals from the water. Place them in the center of the white cotton cloth. Wrap the cloth around the petals. If you’ve cast a circle, close it now. End your rite of thanks by quenching the candle’s flame, pouring the water onto the ground and burying the flowers in the Earth. It is done.

From Living Wicca: A Further Guide for the Solitary Practitioner by Scott Cunningham


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