Link to this Article: http://www.llewellyn.com/journal/article/1864

The Llewellyn Journal

The Magick of Writing Your Own Magick: 8 Easy Steps to Creating Your Own Spells

This article was written by Susan Pesznecker
posted under Pagan

I remember the first time I tried to write a spell of my own. I sat down with paper and pencil and a vague idea of what I wanted to do. But that was it: there I sat, without much idea of what to do next. The results were more difficult than satisfying, and it took several more tries after that one before I began to have a feel for what I was doing. As for my spellwork throughout the learning curve? It wasn’t too good. At times, I turned to prewritten spells to save myself any more frustration.

Most of us magickal people work with spells, charms, or rituals on a regular basis, and many of us are perfectly happy to pull out a spellbook and use a formula that someone else has already created. It’s a simple approach: neat and tidy. Stick a bookmark in pages 23-24, assemble the list of materials, then read through and carry out each step. Voila: a spell! It’s as simple as putting together a new bookshelf, right? Well, yes—it can be, and sometimes a speedy piece of magick is just the thing.

But I’m here to convince you of the beauty and craft of home-crafted spellwork, because when you build a spell yourself, from the ground up, you infuse it with your deliberateness, your preferences, your wishes, your thoughts, and your energies. This spell won’t simply be something you read from someone else’s pages—it will carry your own signature and resonate through your very core. It will be much more powerful and complete than any ready-made charm could ever be, making you an integral part of the magick from start to finish. When we practice spellcraft, we use magick as a way of altering reality. We do this by working with as many of the corresponding realities as possible—time, date, place, elemental correspondences, the support of deities, etc.—in hopes that we can shift reality in one direction or the other and alter the outcome. Nowhere is this more elegantly done than in handcrafting spells, charms, and rituals, because in these instances, we put our essence into the magick and make it our own.

And now, I offer you congratulations: you’ve written your own spell, and chances are it was a fabulous experience. Keep it up, for the more writing you do, the easier (and more fun) it will become. Inspire your inner writer by donning magickal jewelry or regalia, playing evocative music (Native American flute music is excellent), writing at daybreak or sunset, surrounding yourself with color or scent, or working by candle or firelight.

From my book Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, here is a writer’s talisman to help empower you. Begin with a six-inch square of white fabric (representing the four elements). Add one or two pieces of citrine (creativity) or hematite (grounding), a sprig of rosemary (mental powers), and some fresh shavings from a favorite pencil. Add a small piece of paper on which you’ve drawn several stars (creation, pentagrams) with a silver or gold pen. Read the following:

Gathered here, within this square,
Signs of creative power.
Embolden thus my magick craft,
That I may write the hours.
 

Tie the fabric square shut with a piece of green thread (creativity, abundance) and place it where you do most of your writing. When you sit down to write, hold the talisman in your hand for a moment and visualize the energy pouring from it, ready to inspire you. Always remember that writing is powerful magick, so choose and use your words well.

Good writing to you!


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