Link to this Article: http://www.llewellyn.com/journal/article/1879

The Llewellyn Journal

Tarot: A Card a Day

This article was written by Barbara Moore
posted under Tarot

Selecting a card a day is a popular activity among tarot enthusiasts. Although the activity is basically the same—draw a single card each day—there are different reasons or goals, as well as different approaches. Some reasons include: to learn the cards or a specific deck, to check in with Spirit for guidance or inspiration, to use the image as a journaling prompt, or to predict what to expect during the day.

Just as there are different reasons, there are different methods for selecting the card of the day. If your goal is to learn each card in-depth or to become more acquainted with a specific deck, go through the cards in order; the order can be whatever you wish. The point of this method is to have a different card on each of seventy-eight days. Possible orders to consider are: Major Arcana 0 –21, followed by the suits (Wands, Cups, Swords, and Pentacles) Ace – King. A variation would be: Major Arcana 0 – 21 followed by the Aces, the 2s, the 3s, and so on.

For those looking for a daily message, drawing a card randomly is a better way to go. Many people have one deck that is dedicated to card-a-day drawings. Another interesting option is to have a different deck that you use each day of the week. Many tarot enthusiasts have quite a collection of decks but don’t use them. This is a great way to get some use out of a deck that you perhaps don’t like for readings. If you use a different deck each day of the week, just randomly draw a card. Whether you use just one deck or seven, randomly drawing a card has an additional benefit: seeing trends. Keep track of the cards you draw and watch for patterns—repeating cards, a predominance of a certain suit, the numbers, etc. Getting the same card over and over can be a pretty clear sign that the Universe is trying to communicate something! A lot of swords might indicate a time of challenges, or a series of 2s could be a message about balance or choices.

Once you have your card for the day, what do you do with it? There are a lot of options, and here are just a few. Before you draw each card, simply ask, “What do I most need to know today?” Interpret the card as you would, in a general sense, and then apply it to your plans and schedule for the week ahead as guidance. Another way is to write out the interpretation as if it were a daily horoscope providing advice.

One of my favorite ways of using a card-of-day is based on James Wanless’ approach. Use your card and write an affirmation for the day, an action step, and a follow up question (to be answered at the end of day). To see how James does this, follow him on Twitter. Look for @CaptPickACard.

These are just a few ideas for incorporating a card a day into your life. You will undoubtedly think of others. You can ask a different question. Instead of, “What do I need to know?” ask, “What should I do today?” Use the card as a journaling prompt to free write, have a dialogue with the character in the card, or write a haiku. If you like crafts, pick a card to inspire your next creation. You may be surprised both by the depth and power of your experiences with the cards as well the fun you may have.


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