Link to this Article: http://www.llewellyn.com/journal/article/102

The Llewellyn Journal

House That Never Was

This article was written by J. Grimes
posted under

Gather around, gentle readers. Open your eyes and your mind, and get ready to be entertained with the true story of the house that never was. I grew up in a small city in southern Ohio called Zanesville. During my early childhood I was raised on a farm my father owned. When I was about eight years old we sold it and moved to the city. This opened up a whole new world for me, especially after I was given a bike. As passenger and freight trains were still common at that time, a bunch of us kids would ride to the train station and pass our after-school hours watching the coming and going of the trains. Nothing unusual about that, except at certain times when weather conditions were right, such as stormy overcast nights, sometimes we could see the outline of an old house off in the distance.

Being young boys, and given the general nature of children, one day we decided to go and explore the old house. A group of us, five or six children, walked up the long hill in the general direction of where we thought the house ought to be. We got to a piece of flat land that looked like it might have been leveled by machinery many years ago due to the configuration of this area in conjunction with the lack of certain types of flora and fauna common elsewhere. It looked to my eye like someone had once intended to build something on the land but the project was left unfinished.

I moved to New York City right after my 17th birthday, enrolled in drama school, and began my short-lived career as a Shakespearean actor. Years later I moved back to Zanesville, where I met and fell in love with a girl named Marta. She often did favors for my mother. One day I overheard them talking about various things, one of which was my going to the old train yard as a kid. Somehow, the shadowy house got worked into the conversation. I recounted how a group of boys and I climbed the hill to find it, only to find nothing. My girlfriend, who was 10 years older than me, could not remember a house ever having been on the spot I described.

Then my mother told us a story she said neither one of us would have heard as we were too young. She said that there would have been a house on the spot, if the couple had lived to build it. Unfortunately for them, their honeymoon included a flight on the doomed airship, the Hindenberg. They were among the hapless victims burnt to death that day as the airship tried to put down at Lakehurst, New Jersey. The owner dead, the construction stopped, the machines left, and the land began to revert back to its natural state. This explained the flat lot I saw, lacking the trees and flowers one sees growing wild on the rustic hills of southern Ohio.

Being an occultist, I have studied physics and quantum mechanics as I often use the principles connected with these sciences and various mathmatic formulas in conjunction with spell-casting. Based upon my knowledge of science and magick I have formulated the following theory with regard to the house we boys saw. I think that at certain times of the year, when weather systems create the right environment, a “Quantum Time Loop” opens to another reality. We saw what might have been if the owner of the land had decided not to fly back to this country on the Hindenberg. This would confirm what many mystics believe-that every time we make a decision, the universe divides itself into two halves.

Therefore, I can only conclude that in another reality those people chose not to go on the fatal trip with the doomed blimp and went on to live long and happy lives.
-J. Grimes, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.


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