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Sabbats
Sabbats
A Witch's Approach to Living the Old Ways

By: Edain McCoy
Imprint: Llewellyn
Specs: Trade Paperback | 9781567186635
English  |  368 pages | 7 x 10 x 1 IN
7"x10", illus.., photos, index
Pub Date: September 2002
Price: $18.95 US,  $20.95 CAN
$15.16 US,  $16.76 CAN On Sale!
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First and foremost, Witchcraft or Wicca is a religion. In The Sabbats, Edain McCoy reveals the eight major holidays of this faith and the many ways in which they are celebrated.

There are two basic types of holidays. The first come at the Solstices and Equinoxes. The others divide the time between those dates in two, resulting in eight major holidays or Sabbats with approximately the same amount of days between them. The balance, here, gives the appearance of spokes in a wheel, so this cycle is commonly called the Wheel of the Year.

The holidays represent two things. First, the harvest cycle. Each holiday represents a time in the growth of crops. From planting to growth, from harvesting to letting the lands lie fallow in the cold winter, the festivals follow the agricultural cycles of ancient times. However, they also represent the eternal love of the God and Goddess, following the God's birth from the Goddess and his death before she gives birth to him again. This also follows the pattern of the Sun which moves from warm and high in the sky to cold and low in the sky.

The book is filled with ways you can follow the Wheel of the Year, whether you work with a coven, with your family, or by yourself. You will learn the secrets of ritual construction and handicrafts appropriate to each of the festivals. You will also learn recipes for traditional foods for each holiday and even songs appropriate to the Sabbats.

This is a wonderful, joyous book filled with color, information, and wisdom. If you are involved with Paganism in any way, this book is a must for your studies and practices. This book functions as both a resource and as a practical manual for the celebration of the holidays. Get your copy today.


ADDITIONAL TITLES BY THIS AUTHOR
The Witch's Moon
The Witch's Moon
A Collection of Lunar Magick and Rituals
Edain McCoy
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If You Want to be a Witch
If You Want to be a Witch
A Practical Introduction to the Craft
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Advanced Witchcraft
Advanced Witchcraft
Go Deeper, Reach Further, Fly Higher
Edain McCoy
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Celtic Myth & Magick
Celtic Myth & Magick
Harness the Power of the Gods & Goddesses
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A Witch's Guide to Faery Folk
A Witch's Guide to Faery Folk
How to Work with the Elemental World
Edain McCoy
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Astral Projection for Beginners
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