X
OOPS!
VIEW CART
CONTINUE SHOPPING
X
ADDED!
VIEW CART
CONTINUE SHOPPING
X
OOPS!
MANAGE WISHLISTS
CONTINUE SHOPPING
X
ADDED!
CANCEL
(0)
Llewellyn is committed to keeping our staff and customers healthy and safe, as well as being good corporate citizens, during this time. Click to read how we are responding to the COVID-19 pandemic.
134 Spells matching the incense Almond
» More incense
Color of the Day
Incense of the Day

She goes away. We’re forced to wait and believe that she will return. We cannot see her with our physical eyes, yet we know she remains in her orbit high above the earth. It is us who must wait for her return. A new moon calls upon us to have faith. It signals a time of new beginnings. For this spell you will need a black candle, a fireproof candle holder, a saucer, and salt. Place your black candle in the holder, then set it upon the saucer. Pour a circle of salt around the base of the ...

SHARE:    /   PRINT
Color of the Day
Incense of the Day

Apple seeds not only are bitter to taste but contain a miniscule amount of poison. (Don’t worry, it’s not enough to harm you.) This toxic quality makes them useful in banishing spells. On tonight’s waning moon, consider a personal issue or situation that’s been bothering you, making you feel bitter or sour. Gather three apples seeds and find a quiet spot where you won’t be disturbed. Hold the seeds in your hand. Allow yourself to feel the bitterness and negative ...

SHARE:    /   PRINT
Color of the Day
Incense of the Day

What a witch can’t do with a flick of their fingers I’ve yet to discover. In fact, casting magick for opportunity and luck is one of the best ways to spread good karma while feeling awfully witchy with the ol’ crooked finger. Pointing out the good things in your day adds to their aura of power. I like to make it a fun game of “where’s the witch’s joyful pleasure?” Throughout the day, use your pointer finger to charge, bless, and otherwise designate ...

SHARE:    /   PRINT
Color of the Day
Incense of the Day

We’ve come nearly to the end of th e year, to its midnight, to its eldest days. Everything seems old, old, old. This is the season of the crone, of the hag. Hag comes from hagia and means “holy.” The hag is the Holy One. In Northern Europe, hags, called volvas, were sibyls; an important Icelandic text is the Voluspa, “Sibyl’s Vision.” Thanks to the aging of the baby boom generation, we meet crones and sages every day. Cast your circle and set your altar with ...

SHARE:    /   PRINT
FEATURED SPELL
The solstice is a time for gathering resources out from deep in the subconscious. Surround yourself with candles of red, green, and white, and evergreens and holly, as you say: Longest night and...
        
Copyright © 2021 - Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.