Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.
View your shopping cart Shopping Cart | My Account | Help | Become a Fan on Facebook Become a Fan | Follow Us on Twitter Follow Us | Watch Us on YouTube Watch Us | Subscribe to our RSS Feeds Subscribe
Browse ProductsAuthorsArticlesBlogsEncyclopediaNewslettersAffiliate ProgramContact UsBooksellers
Advanced Search
ENCYCLOPEDIA
Glossary
What's New
Most Popular
List of Articles

Email Exclusives
Sign up to receive special offers and promotions from Llewellyn.

Get the Latest Issue of New Worlds

May/June 2015 Issue

New Worlds Catalog

Get the FREE app for your tablet and mobile device. Now available in the iTunes Store and the Google Play Store

Also available as a PDF File.

Click for more information about New Worlds or to receive issues via mail.


The Llewellyn Encyclopedia
Print this Term Print this Article

Cayce's Clairvoyant Visualizations

This article was written by Keith Randolph on May 14, 2002
posted under Creative Visualization

The most famous clairvoyant visualizer of all time is probably Edgar Cayce (1877-1945). Cayce would go into a light trance and clairvoyantly diagnose illnesses of people he did not know or had not even met. Thousands of people were helped by the man who became known as the "Sleeping Prophet."

One of them was a man we‘ll call Jack Bedford. Bedford, a resident of New York City, was a post-office foreman who, with no history of mental illness, suddenly began to develop severe pains in his head. His behavior became erratic, and he had periods of amnesia or irrationality. He grew ever more depressed and irritable and finally his emotional condition cost him his job.

At last Bedford was declared incurably insane, and he was committed to Rockland State Hospital in Orangeburg, New York.

His family and relatives were devastated by this turn of events. To them the whole affair was a dark and terrible mystery. How could this decent, hard-working man have inexplicably fallen victim to overpowering mental illness? But the doctors just shrugged their questions off. They said there was nothing that could be done, and that Bedford’s family should just get on with their lives.

Then Bedford’s sister remembered something a former employer had told her about a man named Cayce. In some miraculous way, Cayce had helped a young Southern woman recover from mental illness. So Bedford’s sister called her former employer, a businessman named David Kahn, who happened to be a friend of Cayce’s. That night Kahn wrote the psychic, saying only that the man "had a nervous breakdown … He is in Rockville State Hospital …"

A few days later the sister received a typewritten note, dated January 7, 1938. It was from Cayce, who offered this diagnosis:

Through pressures upon nerve energies in the coccyx and the ileum plexus, as well as pressure on the lumbar axis, there has been a deflection of the coordination between the sympathetic and the cerebrospinal nervous system.

The note said that the problem was caused by a fall on the ice Bedford had suffered as he was leaving work one day three years earlier. Cayce accurately described the treatment Bedford was getting at the hospital and went on to say which parts of it were worthwhile for the problem and which were not. Bedford "is not insane," Cayce said. "He does not belong in an institution." He concluded by prescribing certain osteopathic methods of healing Bedford’s affliction.

Cayce arrived at this diagnosis as he arrived at all his diagnoses: "by seeing it psychically."

After he got Kahn’s letter describing Bedford's plight, Cayce retired to his study and lay down on a leather-covered couch. As his wife, secretary and two visitors sat nearby, he closed his eyes and went into a trance. Soon he started to speak, saying, "Yes, we have the body …" Next he related what he visualized—all of it, including the diagnosis, which was startlingly accurate. The letter Bedford's sister later received was a transcript of his trance remarks.

Kahn secured the services of a sympathetic physician who was willing to employ the unconventional treatment Cayce had proposed. Six months later Jack Bedford was a well man, out of the mental hospital and back to work at the post office.

When I ask people about their dreams, many times they will recount experiences of crazy landscapes where anything can happen (and probably will). But more often than not, what I hear about is the regularly recurring, repetitive dream that has haunted the dreamer their entire life; I hear over and over again from people that they "always dream of... read this article
5 Ways to Heal with the Wheel of the Year
5 Simple and Instant Creativity Boosts
Reading Tarot Cards: Divining Our Life Path
Ghost-Hunting at the Old Charleston Jail
Visualization for People Who Have Trouble Visualizing

Most recent posts:
The Soul Needs Time
Nancy Antenucci’s book Psychic Tarot is filled with great ways to enhance your connection to the cards and to spirit. It is also filled with...

The Art of Changing
Readers, please enjoy this guest blog post by Tiffany Lazic, author of the new The Great Work: Self-Knowledge and Healing Through the Wheel of the...

Using Imagery for Manifestation
Readers, please enjoy this guest blog post by Melissa Harris, author of the new 99 Keys to a Creative Life. I hope this writing finds you in a...




Where You End Where You End
By: Anna Pellicioli
Price: $9.99 US,  $11.50 CAN
Bite the Biscuit Bite the Biscuit
By: Linda O. Johnston
Price: $14.99 US,  $17.50 CAN
Come to Harm Come to Harm
A Novel

By: Catriona McPherson
Price: $14.99 US,  $17.50 CAN
Llewellyn's Complete Dictionary of Dreams Llewellyn's Complete Dictionary of Dreams
Over 1,000 Dream Symbols and Their Universal Meanings

By: Michael Lennox
Price: $24.99 US,  $28.95 CAN
The Final Reveille The Final Reveille
By: Amanda Flower
Price: $14.99 US,  $17.50 CAN