Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.
View your shopping cart Shopping Cart | My Account | Help | Become a Fan on Facebook Become a Fan | Follow Us on Twitter Follow Us | Watch Us on YouTube Watch Us | Subscribe to our RSS Feeds Subscribe
Browse ProductsAuthorsArticlesBlogsEncyclopediaNewslettersAffiliate ProgramContact UsBooksellers
LLEWELLYN JOURNAL
Article Topics
List of Articles
RSS Data Feeds
Mission Statement
Use of Our Articles
Writers' Guidelines

Email Exclusives
Sign up to receive special offers and promotions from Llewellyn.

Get the Latest Issue of New Worlds

January/February 2017 Issue

New Worlds Catalog

Get the FREE app for your tablet and mobile device. Now available in the iTunes Store†and the Google Play Store

Also available as a PDF File.

Click for more information about New Worlds or to receive issues via mail.


The Llewellyn Journal
Print this Article Print this Article

Donít Call Them Ghosts, Please

This article was written by Kathleen McConnell
posted under Ghosts & Hauntings

Upon reading the title of my book, Don't Call Them Ghosts, one of the first thoughts that probably enters a prospective readerís mind is ďOh no, another ghost story.Ē My emphatic response is ďDonít call them ghosts, please.Ē The first time I made that statement was the Christmas Eve of our first year in the Fontaine Manse. My husband had returned from midnight church services with our daughter. I had had a very eventful evening with my own children and three little spirits that would become known to me as my other children. I came downstairs to meet him in the entryway of the old Victorian house, to keep him from making too much noise. I had some real difficulty convincing our five-year old to finally quit talking and go to sleep or Santa would never come.

Our daughter went upstairs to her bedroom, and George and I stood in the dining room between the huge Christmas tree and the fireplace, just having a few quiet minutes alone. He softly asked me if my little ghosts had been behaving themselves. He might just as well have poured a bucket of ice water on my head because I broke the tranquil mood by turning on him like a snake and rudely replied, ďDonít call them ghosts!Ē George, being the husband that he is, pulled me into his arms and said he hadnít meant anything negative by it. Of course he hadnít. I realized then, as did he, that these children had become an extension of my own family and I had become that proverbial protective mother hen to the three young spirits who belonged in the Fontaine Manse.

Many times over the years I considered writing about our experiences while living with these unseen children, but it seemed to me that people were not ready to accept this scenario as nonfiction. I am a certified professional secretary, and for the past twenty-five years Iíve worked for presidents, executive vice presidents, general managers, and others at the top of the corporate ladder. I personally was not ready to risk having one of my bosses think of me as being less than professional or that perhaps his secretary was a bit ditzy.

In 1996 I felt like the time was right. The general public was now being programmed to accept angels among us, and Sylvia Brown had become a household name. After I wrote the book, I asked the two youngest children to read it. Ward read it and loved it. Being a journalist, he made a few personal comments and was encouraging. Duncan, on the other hand, our youngest son and probably the main player in this cast of characters, was highly opposed to my writing this book and he did not read it. When I asked him why, he told me it was ďtoo personal and too spiritual.Ē

I truly considered Duncanís perspective, but felt that we had a special experience that should be shared. I told him then that the book would probably never be published because it had no sex, no violence, no bad language, and none of the terror that goes along with ghost stories. But I wanted to write the story so that I didnít forget it as I got older. Duncanís last comments were, ďDonít use my real name.Ē

The things that happened in the Fontaine Manse are not likely to ever be forgotten, but memory fades as one gets older and I didnít want to lose any of these precious and extraordinary memories. Against Duncanís pleas, I wrote Donít Call Them Ghosts. At his insistence, I did not use his real name. Until the final edit just weeks ago, I used the name Sean to refer to Duncan. Duncan is proud of his Scottish heritage, and has a very Scottish name. In keeping with that, I thought Sean would suffice. Then a couple of years ago, Duncan went through some critical health problems. I asked him, since he had so much time on his hands, would he consider reading my book? He did. He called to tell me that he loved the book and that it brought back so many memories of his childhood. He told me he laughed and he cried. He told me I could use his real name because I had used everyone elseís real name and anyone who reads it would know who he was anyway. He also gave me the name of a publisher he thought I should send the manuscript to: Llewellyn Worldwide Publications. The rest is history.

This was an easy story to write. I simply went from start to finish through the years we lived there, giving a near verbatim account of how our lives mingled with the lives of these three children. To my startled surprise, as well as my husbandís, I learned that to our children, the secret of the Fontaine Manse was never a secret.

My hope for the reader of Donít Call Them Ghosts is that they come away with more of an open mind to the fact that what we see is not all there is. And, should they ever encounter a spirit left behind, donít assume it is evil, wicked, or negative. Assume that it isnít.

Just for the record, I display in my home today a small toy cannon that was in the attic of the house when we moved into it. In a very unique way, it was a gift to me from the spirit children of the Fontaine Manse that first Christmas we shared.

Kathleen McConnellKathleen McConnell
Born in 1944 in rural New Albany, Indiana, (Margaret) Kathleen McCutcheon was the second youngest of seven children living on a small farm near Louisville, Kentucky. Kathleen McConnell, as she is now known, has extensive experience in the clerical and...  Read more

RELATED PRODUCTS

Don't Call Them Ghosts
Don't Call Them Ghosts
The Spirit Children of Fontaine Manse- A True Story
Kathleen McConnell
$13.95 US,  $15.95 CAN
$6.98 US,  $7.98 CAN On Sale! | Add to Cart

Please note that the use of Llewellyn Journal articles
is subject to certain Terms and Conditions

Tarot Experience is the second in an innovative and wonderful series. The first was Tarot Fundamentals and the final volume will be Tarot Compendium. This book, like its predecessor, is a whopping 640 large, full color pages, each one with a creative interior layout. The presentation of the juicy content is beautifully executed due largely to the... read this article
The Top Five Country Superstars Who Soared Up The Supernatural Charts
How Money Flows at the Sacral and Heart Chakras
The Rose Phoenix
10 Things You Might Not Know About The Exorcist
Magical Tree Oracle: What Do the Trees Have to Tell You?

Most recent posts:
The Art of Shadowscapes
Art of Shadowscapes Tarot So many people absolutely love Stephanie Pui-Mun Lawís gorgeous Shadowscapes Tarot. One of the only complaints we...

Chakra Insight Oracle is One of Ezvid Wiki's 2017 Best Chakra Cards!
The Chakra Insight Oracle is one of Ezvid Wiki's Top Chakra Cards of 2017, coming in at #2! Founded in 2011, Ezvid Wiki was the world's first...

Making the Tarot Your Own
Instead of telling you the one way to read tarot, Your Tarot Your Way embraces the reality that tarot has evolved continuously since its creation...





Pressed to Death Pressed to Death
By: Kirsten Weiss
Price: $14.99 US,  $17.50 CAN
Blood's Echo Blood's Echo
By: Isabella Maldonado
Price: $15.99 US,  $18.50 CAN
Reservations Reservations
By: Gwen Florio
Price: $14.99 US,  $17.50 CAN
Dreamworking Dreamworking
How to Listen to the Inner Guidance of Your Dreams

By: Christopher Sowton
Price: $19.99 US,  $22.95 CAN
The Hearth Witch's Compendium The Hearth Witch's Compendium
Magical and Natural Living for Every Day

By: Anna Franklin
Price: $27.99 US,  $32.50 CAN